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Homo naledi pelvic remains from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Human Evolution, December 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 1,467)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

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25 news outlets
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64 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Homo naledi pelvic remains from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa
Published in
Journal of Human Evolution, December 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jhevol.2017.10.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline VanSickle, Zachary Cofran, Daniel García-Martínez, Scott A. Williams, Steven E. Churchill, Lee R. Berger, John Hawks

Abstract

In the hominin fossil record, pelvic remains are sparse and are difficult to attribute taxonomically when they are not directly associated with craniodental material. Here we describe the pelvic remains from the Dinaledi Chamber in the Rising Star cave system, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa, which has produced hominin fossils of a new species, Homo naledi. Though this species has been attributed to Homo based on cranial and lower limb morphology, the morphology of some of the fragmentary pelvic remains recovered align more closely with specimens attributed to the species Australopithecus afarensis and Australopithecus africanus than they do with those of most (but not all) known species of the genus Homo. As with A. afarensis and A. africanus, H. naledi appears to have had marked lateral iliac flare and either a weakly developed or non-existent acetabulocristal buttress or a distinct, albeit weakly developed, acetabulospinous buttress. At the same time, H. naledi has robust superior pubic and ischiopubic rami and a short ischium with a narrow tuberoacetabular sulcus, similar to those found in modern humans. The fragmentary nature of the Dinaledi pelvic assemblage makes the attribution of sex and developmental age to individual specimens difficult, which in turn diminishes our ability to identify the number of individuals represented in the assemblage. At present, we can only confidently say that the pelvic fossils from Rising Star represent at least four individuals based on the presence of four overlapping right ischial fossils (whereas a minimum of 15 individuals can be identified from the Dinaledi dental assemblage). A primitive, early Australopithecus-like false pelvis combined with a derived Homo-like true pelvis is morphologically consistent with evidence from the lower ribcage and proximal femur of H. naledi. The overall similarity of H. naledi ilia to those of australopiths supports the inference, drawn from the observation of primitive pelvic morphology in the extinct species Homo floresiensis, that there is substantial variation in pelvic form within the genus Homo. In the light of these findings, we urge caution in making taxonomic attributions-even at the genus level-of isolated fossil ossa coxae.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Other 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 36%
Unspecified 3 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 14%
Environmental Science 2 14%
Arts and Humanities 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 231. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2018.
All research outputs
#46,264
of 12,298,276 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Human Evolution
#9
of 1,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,705
of 346,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Human Evolution
#2
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,298,276 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,467 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,151 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.