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Intraspecific evolutionary relationships among peregrine falcons in western North American high latitudes

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Intraspecific evolutionary relationships among peregrine falcons in western North American high latitudes
Published in
PLoS ONE, November 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0188185
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra L. Talbot, George K. Sage, Sarah A. Sonsthagen, Meg C. Gravley, Ted Swem, Jeffrey C. Williams, Jonathan L. Longmire, Skip Ambrose, Melanie J. Flamme, Stephen B. Lewis, Laura Phillips, Clifford Anderson, Clayton M. White

Abstract

Subspecies relationships within the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) have been long debated because of the polytypic nature of melanin-based plumage characteristics used in subspecies designations and potential differentiation of local subpopulations due to philopatry. In North America, understanding the evolutionary relationships among subspecies may have been further complicated by the introduction of captive bred peregrines originating from non-native stock, as part of recovery efforts associated with mid 20th century population declines resulting from organochloride pollution. Alaska hosts all three nominal subspecies of North American peregrine falcons-F. p. tundrius, anatum, and pealei-for which distributions in Alaska are broadly associated with nesting locales within Arctic, boreal, and south coastal maritime habitats, respectively. Unlike elsewhere, populations of peregrine falcon in Alaska were not augmented by captive-bred birds during the late 20th century recovery efforts. Population genetic differentiation analyses of peregrine populations in Alaska, based on sequence data from the mitochondrial DNA control region and fragment data from microsatellite loci, failed to uncover genetic distinction between populations of peregrines occupying Arctic and boreal Alaskan locales. However, the maritime subspecies, pealei, was genetically differentiated from Arctic and boreal populations, and substructured into eastern and western populations. Levels of interpopulational gene flow between anatum and tundrius were generally higher than between pealei and either anatum or tundrius. Estimates based on both marker types revealed gene flow between augmented Canadian populations and unaugmented Alaskan populations. While we make no attempt at formal taxonomic revision, our data suggest that peregrine falcons occupying habitats in Alaska and the North Pacific coast of North America belong to two distinct regional groupings-a coastal grouping (pealei) and a boreal/Arctic grouping (currently anatum and tundrius)-each comprised of discrete populations that are variously intra-regionally connected.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 27%
Unspecified 3 20%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 47%
Unspecified 5 33%
Environmental Science 2 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,456,296
of 12,423,156 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#56,950
of 136,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,223
of 362,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,647
of 4,794 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,423,156 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 136,507 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 362,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,794 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.