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Invariance property of wave scattering through disordered media.

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Invariance property of wave scattering through disordered media.
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1417725111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Romain Pierrat, Philipp Ambichl, Sylvain Gigan, Alexander Haber, Rémi Carminati, Stefan Rotter, Pierrat R, Ambichl P, Gigan S, Haber A, Carminati R, Rotter S

Abstract

A fundamental insight in the theory of diffusive random walks is that the mean length of trajectories traversing a finite open system is independent of the details of the diffusion process. Instead, the mean trajectory length depends only on the system's boundary geometry and is thus unaffected by the value of the mean free path. Here we show that this result is rooted on a much deeper level than that of a random walk, which allows us to extend the reach of this universal invariance property beyond the diffusion approximation. Specifically, we demonstrate that an equivalent invariance relation also holds for the scattering of waves in resonant structures as well as in ballistic, chaotic or in Anderson localized systems. Our work unifies a number of specific observations made in quite diverse fields of science ranging from the movement of ants to nuclear scattering theory. Potential experimental realizations using light fields in disordered media are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 8%
Russian Federation 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
France 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Vietnam 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 52 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 39%
Researcher 12 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 14%
Student > Master 8 13%
Professor 4 6%
Other 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 49 77%
Engineering 11 17%
Computer Science 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Chemistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 118. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2015.
All research outputs
#50,018
of 7,051,624 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,579
of 42,507 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,116
of 228,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#92
of 954 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,051,624 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 42,507 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,868 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 954 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.