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Signatures of aestivation and migration in Sahelian malaria mosquito populations

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
141 Mendeley
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Title
Signatures of aestivation and migration in Sahelian malaria mosquito populations
Published in
Nature, November 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature13987
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Dao, A. S. Yaro, M. Diallo, S. Timbiné, D. L. Huestis, Y. Kassogué, A. I. Traoré, Z. L. Sanogo, D. Samaké, T. Lehmann

Abstract

During the long Sahelian dry season, mosquito vectors of malaria are expected to perish when no larval sites are available; yet, days after the first rains, mosquitoes reappear in large numbers. How these vectors persist over the 3-6-month long dry season has not been resolved, despite extensive research for over a century. Hypotheses for vector persistence include dry-season diapause (aestivation) and long-distance migration (LDM); both are facets of vector biology that have been highly controversial owing to lack of concrete evidence. Here we show that certain species persist by a form of aestivation, while others engage in LDM. Using time-series analyses, the seasonal cycles of Anopheles coluzzii, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (s.s.), and Anopheles arabiensis were estimated, and their effects were found to be significant, stable and highly species-specific. Contrary to all expectations, the most complex dynamics occurred during the dry season, when the density of A. coluzzii fluctuated markedly, peaking when migration would seem highly unlikely, whereas A. gambiae s.s. was undetected. The population growth of A. coluzzii followed the first rains closely, consistent with aestivation, whereas the growth phase of both A. gambiae s.s. and A. arabiensis lagged by two months. Such a delay is incompatible with local persistence, but fits LDM. Surviving the long dry season in situ allows A. coluzzii to predominate and form the primary force of malaria transmission. Our results reveal profound ecological divergence between A. coluzzii and A. gambiae s.s., whose standing as distinct species has been challenged, and suggest that climate is one of the selective pressures that led to their speciation. Incorporating vector dormancy and LDM is key to predicting shifts in the range of malaria due to global climate change, and to the elimination of malaria from Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
France 2 1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 132 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 24%
Researcher 28 20%
Student > Master 24 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 4%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 16 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 48%
Environmental Science 13 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 8%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 19 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 66. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2020.
All research outputs
#351,737
of 16,168,258 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#18,595
of 76,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,578
of 309,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#385
of 902 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,168,258 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 76,524 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 87.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,525 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 902 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.