↓ Skip to main content

In the shadow of coal: How large-scale industries contributed to present-day regional differences in personality and well-being.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, November 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
27 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
33 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
In the shadow of coal: How large-scale industries contributed to present-day regional differences in personality and well-being.
Published in
Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, November 2018
DOI 10.1037/pspp0000175
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Obschonka, Michael Stuetzer, Peter J. Rentfrow, Leigh Shaw-Taylor, Max Satchell, Rainer K. Silbereisen, Jeff Potter, Samuel D. Gosling

Abstract

Recent research has identified regional variation of personality traits within countries but we know little about the underlying drivers of this variation. We propose that the Industrial Revolution, as a key era in the history of industrialized nations, has led to a persistent clustering of well-being outcomes and personality traits associated with psychological adversity via processes of selective migration and socialization. Analyzing data from England and Wales, we examine relationships between the historical employment share in large-scale coal-based industries (coal mining and steam-powered manufacturing industries that used this coal as fuel for their steam engines) and today's regional variation in personality and well-being. Even after controlling for possible historical confounds (historical energy supply, education, wealth, geology, climate, population density), we find that the historical local dominance of large-scale coal-based industries predicts today's markers of psychological adversity (lower Conscientiousness [and order facet scores], higher Neuroticism [and anxiety and depression facet scores], lower activity [an Extraversion facet], and lower life satisfaction and life expectancy). An instrumental variable analysis, using the historical location of coalfields, supports the causal assumption behind these effects (with the exception of life satisfaction). Further analyses focusing on mechanisms hint at the roles of selective migration and persisting economic hardship. Finally, a robustness check in the U.S. replicates the effect of the historical concentration of large-scale industries on today's levels of psychological adversity. Taken together, the results show how today's regional patterns of personality and well-being (which shape the future trajectories of these regions) may have their roots in major societal changes underway decades or centuries earlier. (PsycINFO Database Record

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 21%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 7%
Other 19 22%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 40%
Social Sciences 11 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 23 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 245. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2020.
All research outputs
#71,641
of 16,060,413 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Personality & Social Psychology
#82
of 6,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,050
of 413,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Personality & Social Psychology
#4
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,060,413 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,782 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 413,404 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.