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Deep inspiration breathhold for left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy requiring internal mammary nodal irradiation

Overview of attention for article published in Practical Radiation Oncology, November 2017
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Title
Deep inspiration breathhold for left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy requiring internal mammary nodal irradiation
Published in
Practical Radiation Oncology, November 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.prro.2017.04.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Osama Mohamad, Jean Shiao, Bo Zhao, Karen Roach, Ezequiel Ramirez, Dat T. Vo, Kimberly Thomas, Xuejun Gu, Ann Spangler, Kevin Albuquerque, Asal Rahimi

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of moderate deep inspiration breathhold (mDIBH) in reducing heart exposure in left breast cancer patients who have unfavorable cardiac anatomy and need internal mammary lymph node (IMLN) radiation therapy (RT). We used maximum heart distance (MHD), defined as the maximum distance of the heart within the treatment field, >1 cm as a surrogate for unfavorable cardiac anatomy. Twenty-two left breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy requiring IMLN-RT underwent free-breathing (FB) and mDIBH computed tomography simulation and planning. Three-dimensional partially wide tangents (3D-PWTs) and intensity modulated RT plans were generated. Dose-volume histograms were used to compare heart and lung dosimetric parameters. Duration of treatment delivery was recorded for all fractions. MHD decreased significantly in mDIBH scans. mDIBH significantly reduced mean heart dose (222.7 vs 578.4 cGy; P < .0001) and percentage of left lung receiving doses ≥20 Gy (V20; 31.93 vs 38.41%; P = .0006) in both 3D-PWT and intensity modulated RT plans. The change in MHD after breathhold reliably predicted mean heart dose reduction after mDIBH. Radiation was effectively delivered in 11.31 ± 3.40 minutes with an average of 10.06 ± 2.74 breathholds per fraction. mDIBH is efficient and can effectively decrease mean heart dose in patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy who need IMLN-RT, thus simplifying planning and delivery for them. The reduction in mean heart dose is proportional to the reduction in maximum heart distance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 15%
Professor 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Physics and Astronomy 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 8 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,621,199
of 12,530,846 outputs
Outputs from Practical Radiation Oncology
#279
of 384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#252,522
of 384,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Practical Radiation Oncology
#14
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,530,846 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.1. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 384,691 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.