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Divergent clades or cryptic species? Mito-nuclear discordance in a Daphnia species complex

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
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Title
Divergent clades or cryptic species? Mito-nuclear discordance in a Daphnia species complex
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1070-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Thielsch, Alexis Knell, Ali Mohammadyari, Adam Petrusek, Klaus Schwenk

Abstract

Genetically divergent cryptic species are frequently detected by molecular methods. These discoveries are often a byproduct of molecular barcoding studies in which fragments of a selected marker are used for species identification. Highly divergent mitochondrial lineages and putative cryptic species are even detected in intensively studied animal taxa, such as the crustacean genus Daphnia. Recently, eleven such lineages, exhibiting genetic distances comparable to levels observed among well-defined species, were recorded in the D. longispina species complex, a group that contains several key taxa of freshwater ecosystems. We tested if three of those lineages represent indeed distinct species, by analyzing patterns of variation of ten nuclear microsatellite markers in six populations. We observed a discordant pattern between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, as all individuals carrying one of the divergent mitochondrial lineages grouped at the nuclear level with widespread, well-recognized species coexisting at the same localities (Daphnia galeata, D. longispina, and D. cucullata). A likely explanation for this pattern is the introgression of the mitochondrial genome of undescribed taxa into the common species, either in the distant past or after long-distance dispersal. The occurrence of highly divergent but rare mtDNA lineages in the gene pool of widespread species would suggest that hybridization and introgression in the D. longispina species complex is frequent even across large phylogenetic distances, and that discoveries of such distinct clades must be interpreted with caution. However, maintenance of ancient polymorphisms through selection is another plausible alternative that may cause the observed discordance and cannot be entirely excluded.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 74 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 26%
Researcher 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Master 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 28%
Environmental Science 8 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,592,436
of 12,588,563 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,727
of 2,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,037
of 386,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#181
of 239 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,588,563 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 386,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 239 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.