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Patterns of initiation of second generation antipsychotics for bipolar disorder: a month-by-month analysis of provider behavior

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, November 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

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12 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Patterns of initiation of second generation antipsychotics for bipolar disorder: a month-by-month analysis of provider behavior
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0339-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher J Miller, Mingfei Li, Robert B Penfold, Austin F Lee, Eric G Smith, David N Osser, Laura Bajor, Mark S Bauer

Abstract

BackgroundSeveral second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) received FDA approval for bipolar disorder in the 2000s. Although efficacious, they have been costly and may cause significant side effects. Little is known about the factors associated with prescribers¿ decisions to initiate SGA prescriptions for this condition.MethodsWe gathered administrative data from the Department of Veterans Affairs on 170,713 patients with bipolar disorder between fiscal years 2003¿2010. Patients without a prior history of taking SGAs were considered eligible for SGA initiation during the study (n =126,556). Generalized estimating equations identified demographic, clinical, and comorbidity variables associated with initiation of an SGA prescription on a month-by-month basis.ResultsWhile the number of patients with bipolar disorder using SGAs nearly doubled between 2003 and 2010, analyses controlling for patient characteristics and the rise in the bipolar population revealed a 1.2% annual decline in SGA initiation during this period. Most medical comorbidities were only modestly associated with overall SGA initiation, although significant differences emerged among individual SGAs. Several markers of patient severity predicted SGA initiation, including previous hospitalizations, psychotic features, and a history of other antimanic prescriptions; these severity markers became less firmly linked to SGA initiation over time. Providers in the South were somewhat more likely to initiate SGA treatment.ConclusionsThe number of veterans with bipolar disorder prescribed SGAs is rising steadily, but this increase appears primarily driven by a corresponding increase in the bipolar population. Month-by-month analyses revealed that higher illness severity predicted SGA initiation, but that this association may be weakening over time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Professor 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 17%
Mathematics 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2015.
All research outputs
#3,038,275
of 17,819,859 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,163
of 3,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,989
of 317,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#84
of 346 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,819,859 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,821 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,293 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 346 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.