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Bacterial Pathogen Gene Abundance and Relation to Recreational Water Quality at Seven Great Lakes Beaches

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, November 2014
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Title
Bacterial Pathogen Gene Abundance and Relation to Recreational Water Quality at Seven Great Lakes Beaches
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, November 2014
DOI 10.1021/es5038657
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryan J. Oster, Rasanthi U. Wijesinghe, Sheridan K. Haack, Lisa R. Fogarty, Taaja R. Tucker, Stephen C. Riley

Abstract

Quantitative assessment of bacterial pathogens, their geographic variability, and distribution in various matrices at Great Lakes beaches are limited. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to test for genes from E. coli O157:H7 (eaeO157), shiga-toxin producing E. coli (stx2), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), Shigella spp. (ipaH), and a Salmonella enterica-specific (SE) DNA sequence at seven Great Lakes beaches, in algae, water, and sediment. Overall, detection frequencies were mapA>stx2>ipaH>SE>eaeO157. Results were highly variable among beaches and matrices; some correlations with environmental conditions were observed for mapA, stx2, and ipaH detections. Beach seasonal mean mapA abundance in water was correlated with beach seasonal mean log10 E. coli concentration. At one beach, stx2 gene abundance was positively correlated with concurrent daily E. coli concentrations. Concentration distributions for stx2, ipaH, and mapA within algae, sediment, and water were statistically different (Non-Detect and Data Analysis in R). Assuming 10, 50, or 100% of gene copies represented viable and presumably infective cells, a quantitative microbial risk assessment tool developed by Michigan State University indicated a moderate probability of illness for Campylobacter jejuni at the study beaches, especially where recreational water quality criteria were exceeded. Pathogen gene quantification may be useful for beach water quality management.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
China 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 33 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Researcher 7 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 14%
Unspecified 5 14%
Other 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 10 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 16%
Unspecified 6 16%
Engineering 6 16%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2014.
All research outputs
#10,911,725
of 12,313,065 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#11,803
of 12,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,418
of 270,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#264
of 290 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,313,065 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,355 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 290 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.