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What intrinsic and extrinsic factors explain the stoichiometric diversity of aquatic heterotrophic bacteria?

Overview of attention for article published in ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
Title
What intrinsic and extrinsic factors explain the stoichiometric diversity of aquatic heterotrophic bacteria?
Published in
ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, November 2017
DOI 10.1038/ismej.2017.195
Pubmed ID
Authors

Casey M Godwin, James B Cotner

Abstract

The elemental content of microbial communities is dependent upon the physiology of constituent populations, yet ecological stoichiometry has made slow progress toward identifying predictors of how species and strains change the elemental content of their biomass in response to the stoichiometry of elements in resources. We asked whether the elemental content of aquatic bacteria, especially flexibility in elemental content, could be predicted by their phylogeny, maximum growth rate or lake productivity. We examined 137 isolates using chemostats and found that strains differed substantially in how the carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus ratios (C:N:P) in their biomass responded to P-sufficient and P-limiting conditions. The median strain increased its biomass C:N:P from 68:14:1 to 164:25:1 under P limitation. Patterns in elemental content and ratios were partly explained by phylogeny, yet flexibility in elemental content showed no phylogenetic signal. The growth rate hypothesis predicts that P content is positively related to growth rate, but we found weak correlation between maximum growth rate and P content among the strains. Overall, isolates from highly productive lakes had higher maximum growth rates and less flexible biomass N:P than isolates from unproductive lakes. These results show that bacteria present within lake communities exhibit diverse strategies for responding to elemental imbalance.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 24 November 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.195.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 38%
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Unspecified 2 4%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 31%
Environmental Science 10 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 16%
Unspecified 7 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 9%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2017.
All research outputs
#313,604
of 12,302,005 outputs
Outputs from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#129
of 1,954 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,168
of 346,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#8
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,302,005 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,954 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.