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Dispersal and selection mediate hybridization between a native and invasive species

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
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Title
Dispersal and selection mediate hybridization between a native and invasive species
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2015
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.2454
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryan P. Kovach, Clint C. Muhlfeld, Matthew C. Boyer, Winsor H. Lowe, Fred W. Allendorf, Gordon Luikart

Abstract

Hybridization between native and non-native species has serious biological consequences, but our understanding of how dispersal and selection interact to influence invasive hybridization is limited. Here, we document the spread of genetic introgression between a native (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and invasive (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout, and identify the mechanisms influencing genetic admixture. In two populations inhabiting contrasting environments, non-native admixture increased rapidly from 1984 to 2007 and was driven by surprisingly consistent processes. Individual admixture was related to two phenotypic traits associated with fitness: size at spawning and age of juvenile emigration. Fish with higher non-native admixture were larger and tended to emigrate at a younger age--relationships that are expected to confer fitness advantages to hybrid individuals. However, strong selection against non-native admixture was evident across streams and cohorts (mean selection coefficient against genotypes with non-native alleles (s) = 0.60; s.e. = 0.10). Nevertheless, hybridization was promoted in both streams by the continuous immigration of individuals with high levels of non-native admixture from other hybrid source populations. Thus, antagonistic relationships between dispersal and selection are mediating invasive hybridization between these fish, emphasizing that data on dispersal and natural selection are needed to fully understand the dynamics of introgression between native and non-native species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 6%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 105 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 22%
Student > Master 25 22%
Researcher 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Other 7 6%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 5 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 69 60%
Environmental Science 22 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 7%
Computer Science 2 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 2%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 9 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,301,149
of 14,540,762 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3,209
of 7,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,693
of 302,130 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#90
of 168 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,540,762 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,820 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,130 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 168 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.