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Chronic Multisymptom Illness: A Comparison of Iraq and Afghanistan Deployers With Veterans of the 1991 Gulf War

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Epidemiology, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Chronic Multisymptom Illness: A Comparison of Iraq and Afghanistan Deployers With Veterans of the 1991 Gulf War
Published in
American Journal of Epidemiology, December 2014
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwu240
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. C. Smith, T. M. Powell, I. G. Jacobson, B. Smith, T. I. Hooper, E. J. Boyko, G. D. Gackstetter

Abstract

Symptoms and illnesses reported by veterans of the 1991 Gulf War era are a cause of potential concern for those military members who have deployed to the Gulf region in support of more recent contingency operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. In the present study, we quantified self-reported symptoms from participants in the Millennium Cohort Study, a prospective study representing all US service branches, including both active duty and Reserve/National Guard components (2001-2008). Self-reported symptoms were uniquely compared with those in a cohort of subjects from the 1991 Gulf War to gain context for the present report. Symptoms were then aggregated to identify cases of chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) based on the case definition from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The prevalence of self-reported CMI symptoms was compared with that collected in 1997-1999 from a study population of US Seabees from the 1991 Gulf War, as well as from deployed and nondeployed subgroups. Although overall symptom reporting was much less in the Millennium Cohort than in the 1991 Gulf War cohort, a higher prevalence of reported CMI was noted among deployed compared with nondeployed contemporary cohort members. An increased understanding of coping skills and resilience and development of well-designed screening instruments, along with appropriate clinical and psychological follow-up for returning veterans, might help to focus resources on early identification of potential long-term chronic disease manifestations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 9%
United Kingdom 1 5%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 5%
Unknown 18 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 23%
Researcher 4 18%
Unspecified 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 27%
Psychology 3 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2014.
All research outputs
#6,915,540
of 12,023,633 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Epidemiology
#5,948
of 7,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,216
of 273,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Epidemiology
#49
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,023,633 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,038 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,684 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.