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Analysis of the Phlebiopsis gigantea Genome, Transcriptome and Secretome Provides Insight into Its Pioneer Colonization Strategies of Wood

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Genetics, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Analysis of the Phlebiopsis gigantea Genome, Transcriptome and Secretome Provides Insight into Its Pioneer Colonization Strategies of Wood
Published in
PLoS Genetics, December 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004759
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chiaki Hori, Takuya Ishida, Kiyohiko Igarashi, Masahiro Samejima, Hitoshi Suzuki, Emma Master, Patricia Ferreira, Francisco J. Ruiz-Dueñas, Benjamin Held, Paulo Canessa, Luis F. Larrondo, Monika Schmoll, Irina S. Druzhinina, Christian P. Kubicek, Jill A. Gaskell, Phil Kersten, Franz St. John, Jeremy Glasner, Grzegorz Sabat, Sandra Splinter BonDurant, Khajamohiddin Syed, Jagjit Yadav, Anthony C. Mgbeahuruike, Andriy Kovalchuk, Fred O. Asiegbu, Gerald Lackner, Dirk Hoffmeister, Jorge Rencoret, Ana Gutiérrez, Hui Sun, Erika Lindquist, Kerrie Barry, Robert Riley, Igor V. Grigoriev, Bernard Henrissat, Ursula Kües, Randy M. Berka, Angel T. Martínez, Sarah F. Covert, Robert A. Blanchette, Daniel Cullen

Abstract

Collectively classified as white-rot fungi, certain basidiomycetes efficiently degrade the major structural polymers of wood cell walls. A small subset of these Agaricomycetes, exemplified by Phlebiopsis gigantea, is capable of colonizing freshly exposed conifer sapwood despite its high content of extractives, which retards the establishment of other fungal species. The mechanism(s) by which P. gigantea tolerates and metabolizes resinous compounds have not been explored. Here, we report the annotated P. gigantea genome and compare profiles of its transcriptome and secretome when cultured on fresh-cut versus solvent-extracted loblolly pine wood. The P. gigantea genome contains a conventional repertoire of hydrolase genes involved in cellulose/hemicellulose degradation, whose patterns of expression were relatively unperturbed by the absence of extractives. The expression of genes typically ascribed to lignin degradation was also largely unaffected. In contrast, genes likely involved in the transformation and detoxification of wood extractives were highly induced in its presence. Their products included an ABC transporter, lipases, cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Other regulated genes of unknown function and several constitutively expressed genes are also likely involved in P. gigantea's extractives metabolism. These results contribute to our fundamental understanding of pioneer colonization of conifer wood and provide insight into the diverse chemistries employed by fungi in carbon cycling processes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Finland 1 1%
Taiwan 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 93 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 27%
Student > Master 10 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 8%
Unspecified 6 6%
Other 21 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 67%
Unspecified 12 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Environmental Science 4 4%
Computer Science 4 4%
Other 6 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2017.
All research outputs
#2,003,330
of 12,091,691 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Genetics
#2,314
of 6,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,140
of 275,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Genetics
#73
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,691 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,176 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,959 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.