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Fatty-acid profiles of white muscle and liver in stream-maturing steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from early migration to kelt emigration

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Fish Biology, November 2014
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1 tweeter

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Title
Fatty-acid profiles of white muscle and liver in stream-maturing steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from early migration to kelt emigration
Published in
Journal of Fish Biology, November 2014
DOI 10.1111/jfb.12552
Pubmed ID
Authors

Z. L. Penney, C. M. Moffitt

Abstract

The profiles of specific fatty acids (FA) in white muscle and liver of fasting steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were evaluated at three periods during their prespawning migration and at kelt emigration in the Snake-Columbia River of Washington, Oregon and Idaho, to improve the understanding of energy change. Twenty-seven FAs were identified; depletion of 10 of these was positively correlated in liver and white muscle of prespawning O. mykiss. To observe relative changes in FA content more accurately over sampling intervals, the lipid fraction of tissues was used to normalize the quantity of individual FA to an equivalent tissue wet mass. Saturated and monounsaturated FAs were depleted between upstream migration in September and kelt emigration in June, whereas polyunsaturated FAs were more conserved. Liver was depleted of FAs more rapidly than muscle. Three FAs were detected across all sampling intervals: 16:0, 18:1 and 22:6n3, which are probably structurally important to membranes. When structurally important FAs of O. mykiss are depleted to provide energy, physiological performance and survival may be affected.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 6%
Unknown 15 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 31%
Student > Master 4 25%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 75%
Unspecified 2 13%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2014.
All research outputs
#9,759,792
of 12,209,843 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Fish Biology
#2,104
of 2,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,661
of 274,523 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Fish Biology
#62
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,209,843 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,523 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.