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Common mental disorders and sociodemographic characteristics: baseline findings of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, April 2016
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Title
Common mental disorders and sociodemographic characteristics: baseline findings of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, April 2016
DOI 10.1590/1516-4446-2015-1714
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nunes, Maria A., Pinheiro, Andréa P., Bessel, Marina, Brunoni, André R., Kemp, Andrew H., Benseñor, Isabela M., Chor, Dora, Barreto, Sandhi, Schmidt, Maria I.

Abstract

To assess the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD) and the association of CMD with sociodemographic characteristics in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) cohort. We analyzed data from the cross-sectional baseline assessment of the ELSA-Brasil, a cohort study of 15,105 civil servants from six Brazilian cities. The Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R) was used to investigate the presence of CMD, with a score ≥ 12 indicating a current CMD (last week). Specific diagnostic algorithms for each disorder were based on the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Prevalence ratios (PR) of the association between CMD and sociodemographic characteristics were estimated by Poisson regression. CMD (CIS-R score ≥ 12) was found in 26.8% (95% confidence intervals [95%CI] 26.1-27.5). The highest burden occurred among women (PR 1.9; 95%CI 1.8-2.0), the youngest (PR 1.7; 95%CI 1.5-1.9), non-white individuals, and those without a university degree. The most frequent diagnostic category was anxiety disorders (16.2%), followed by depressive episodes (4.2%). The burden of CMD was high, particularly among the more socially vulnerable groups. These findings highlight the need to strengthen public policies aimed to address health inequities related to mental disorders.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 18%
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 13%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 8%
Other 25 23%
Unknown 17 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 18%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Psychology 8 7%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 28 26%