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Loss of dendritic connectivity in southern California's urban riverscape facilitates decline of an endemic freshwater fish

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

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5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Loss of dendritic connectivity in southern California's urban riverscape facilitates decline of an endemic freshwater fish
Published in
Molecular Ecology, December 2017
DOI 10.1111/mec.14445
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan Q. Richmond, Adam R. Backlin, Carey Galst-Cavalcante, John W. O'Brien, Robert N. Fisher

Abstract

Life history adaptations and spatial configuration of metapopulation networks allow certain species to persist in extreme fluctuating environments, yet long-term stability within these systems relies on the maintenance of linkage habitat. Degradation of such linkages in urban riverscapes can disrupt this dynamic in aquatic species, leading to increased extinction debt in local populations experiencing environment-related demographic flux. We used microsatellites and mtDNA to examine the effects of collapsed network structure in the endemic Santa Ana sucker Catostomus santaanae of southern California, a threatened species affected by natural flood-drought cycles, 'boom-and-bust' demography, hybridization, and presumed artificial transplantation. Our results show a predominance of drift-mediated processes in shaping population structure, and that reverse mechanisms for counterbalancing the genetic effects of these phenomena have dissipated with the collapse of dendritic connectivity. We use approximate Bayesian models to support two cases of artificial transplantation, and provide evidence that one of the invaded systems better represents the historic processes that maintained genetic variation within watersheds than any remaining drainages where C. santaanae is considered native. We further show that a stable dry gap in the northern range is preventing genetic dilution of pure C. santaanae persisting upstream of a hybrid assemblage involving a non-native sucker, and that local accumulation of genetic variation in the same drainage is influenced by position within the network. This work has important implications for declining species that have historically relied on dendritic metapopulation networks to maintain source-sink dynamics in phasic environments, but no longer possess this capacity in urban-converted landscapes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 28%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 39%
Environmental Science 12 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2020.
All research outputs
#6,751,369
of 20,775,181 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#3,373
of 6,000 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#158,633
of 441,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#92
of 115 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,775,181 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,000 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 441,132 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 115 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.