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Risk factors associated with preterm birth among singletons following assisted reproductive technology in Australia 2007–2009–a population-based retrospective study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Risk factors associated with preterm birth among singletons following assisted reproductive technology in Australia 2007–2009–a population-based retrospective study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12884-014-0406-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xu K Xu, Yueping A Wang, Zhuoyang Li, Kei Lui, Elizabeth A Sullivan

Abstract

BackgroundPreterm birth, a leading cause of neonatal death, is more common in multiple births and thus there has being an increasing call for reducing multiple births in ART. However, few studies have compared risk factors for preterm births amongst ART and non-ART singleton birth mothers.MethodsA population-based study of 393,450 mothers, including 12,105 (3.1%) ART mothers, with singleton gestations born between 2007 and 2009 in 5 of the 8 jurisdictions in Australia. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were conducted to evaluate socio-demographic, medical and pregnancy factors associated with preterm births in contrasting ART and non-ART mothers.ResultsTen percent of singleton births to ART mothers were preterm compared to 6.8% for non-ART mothers (P¿<¿0.01). Compared with non-ART mothers, ART mothers were older (mean 34.0 vs 29.7 yr respectively), less socio-economically disadvantaged (12.4% in the lowest quintile vs 20.7%), less likely to be smokers (3.8% vs 19.4%), more likely to be first time mothers (primiparous 62.4% vs 40.5%), had more preexisting hypertension and complications during pregnancy. Irrespective of the mode of conception, preexisting medical and pregnancy complications of hypertension, diabetes and antepartum hemorrhages were consistently associated with preterm birth. In contrast, socio-demographic variables, namely young and old maternal age (<25 and >34), socioeconomic disadvantage (most disadvantaged quintile Odds Ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.77¿1.17), smoking (OR 1.12, 95%CI: 0.79¿1.61) and priminarity (OR 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05¿1.35, AOR not significant) shown to be associated with elevated risk of preterm birth for non-ART mothers were not demonstrated for ART mothers, even after adjusting for potential confounders. Nonetheless, in multivariable analysis, the association between ART and the elevated risk for singleton preterm birth persisted after controlling for all included confounding medical, pregnancy and socio-economic factors (AOR 1.51, 95%CI: 1.42¿1.61).ConclusionsPreterm birth rate is approximately one-and-a-half-fold higher in ART mothers than non-ART mothers albeit for singleton births after controlling for confounding factors. However, ART mothers were less subject to the adverse influence from socio-demographic factors than non-ART mothers. This has implications for counselling prospective parents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 7 18%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Engineering 2 5%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 10 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,179,875
of 12,607,969 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,004
of 2,305 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,824
of 290,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#159
of 374 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,607,969 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,305 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,262 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 374 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.