↓ Skip to main content

Impact of pharmacist-led medication management in care transitions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Impact of pharmacist-led medication management in care transitions
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2684-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seungwon Yang

Abstract

When patients are discharged from hospital to home, it is a highlighted vulnerable period for which medication - related problems are prevalent. Researchers have proposed a telephone follow-up intervention as a means to reduce hospital readmissions. However, the outcome of the intervention with the engagement of pharmacists in managing patients' medicines after discharge has not been well explored. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine whether a pharmacist telephone follow-up intervention focusing on patients' medicines management support is associated with a reduction in 30-day readmission rates and (2) to describe the number and types of pharmacist interventions in care transitions. This was a case-cohort study conducted in two acute hospitals in the UK. Pharmacists performed a telephone follow-up intervention to discharged patients to provide medicines management support. Patients who received pharmacist telephone follow-up calls within 14 days of discharge formed the intervention group. A subset of medical patient population discharged in the month of May 2013 formed the comparison group. During a series of two-telephone follow-up, pharmacists identified post-discharge pharmaceutical problems and provided patient-tailored interventions accordingly. The impact of pharmacist interventions was assessed using a risk assessment matrix tool by two senior pharmacists. Overall 30-day readmission rates in the intervention group were measured and compared with the comparison group using a chi-square test. Between 5(th) and 25(th) June 2013, a total of 62 medical patients participated in the study. Pharmacists provided 192 interventions as a result of pharmacist telephone follow-up intervention. The most prevalent type of interventions was the provision of drug information (n=40), followed by screening patient adherence (n=30) and advising on adverse drug reactions (n=27). The impact of interventions was assessed, and 49.3% of the identified risks intervened by pharmacists were associated with moderate risk. The 30-day readmission rates in the intervention group were 11.3% compared to 9.0% in the control group (p = 0.376); this was not statistically significant. A pharmacist TFU intervention did not show a benefit in 30-day hospital readmissions. However, a pharmacist TFU intervention was an effective method to solve or avoid critical pharmaceutical problems. A future study using a larger scale trial is warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 15%
Other 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 10 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 14 42%
Unspecified 7 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,769,660
of 12,225,951 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,333
of 3,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#242,815
of 339,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#146
of 204 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,225,951 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,999 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,290 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 204 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.