↓ Skip to main content

Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors and dietary intakes among Javanese Surinamese and South-Asian Surinamese in the Netherlands. The HELIUS study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2017
Altmetric Badge

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors and dietary intakes among Javanese Surinamese and South-Asian Surinamese in the Netherlands. The HELIUS study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-2352-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qaisar Raza, Marieke B. Snijder, Jacob C. Seidell, Ron J. G. Peters, Mary Nicolaou

Abstract

Ethnic differences regarding the percent of non-communicable diseases have been shown in Asia but the studies on Asian subgroups living in the western countries regarding percent of cardiovascular risk factors and dietary intakes have been scarce. Therefore we compared the percent of cardiovascular risk factors and dietary intakes between Javanese Surinamese who are originally from Indonesia and South-Asian Surinamese who are originally from India. Cross-sectional baseline data of the HELIUS (Healthy Life in an Urban Setting) study were used, including data of 2935 Surinamese participants (197 of Javanese and 2738 of South-Asian origin) out of which 1160 participants (78 Javanese and 1082 South-Asian) additionally reported dietary intake data. Descriptive statistics were used to compare the two ethnic groups regarding cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia; in addition, dietary intake of foods like vegetables, red meat, fruit, high fibre foods, low fibre foods, high fat and low fat dairy products, chicken and sugar sweetened beverages were also compared between the two groups. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to adjust for age and sex when comparing the two groups. South-Asian Surinamese had a significantly higher percent of abdominal obesity (OR 2.44; CI 1.66-3.57), cardiovascular disease (OR 2.55; CI 1.48-4.35) and diabetes (OR 2.77; CI 1.67-4.60) as compared with Javanese Surinamese after adjustment for age and sex. The percent of obesity (BMI), hypertension, and lipids was not significantly different between the ethnic groups. Javanese Surinamese had a significantly higher intake of red meat and a significantly lower intake of dairy products as compared with South-Asian Surinamese. Intakes of vegetables, grains, fish, fruits, tea and coffee did not significantly differ between the ethnic groups. Both groups showed intake of considerable amount of sugar sweetened beverages. Public health practitioners in the Netherlands and elsewhere in the world should take into account the ethnic subgroup differences within the broader groups like Asians when developing interventions related to health among ethnic minorities.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 2%
Taiwan 1 2%
Unknown 50 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 17%
Student > Master 9 17%
Unspecified 9 17%
Researcher 5 10%
Other 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 40%
Unspecified 13 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Other 5 10%