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Understanding the shoot apical meristem regulation: A study of the phytohormones, auxin and cytokinin, in rice

Overview of attention for article published in Mechanisms of Development, February 2015
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2 tweeters

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137 Mendeley
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Title
Understanding the shoot apical meristem regulation: A study of the phytohormones, auxin and cytokinin, in rice
Published in
Mechanisms of Development, February 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.mod.2014.11.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. Azizi, M.Y. Rafii, M. Maziah, S.N.A. Abdullah, M.M. Hanafi, M.A. Latif, A.A. Rashid, M. Sahebi

Abstract

Auxin and cytokinin regulate different critical processes involved in plant growth and environmental feedbacks. These plant hormones act either synergistically or antagonistically to control the organisation, formation and maintenance of meristem. Meristem cells can be divided to generate new tissues and organs at the locations of plant postembryonic development. The aboveground plant organs are created by the shoot apical meristem (SAM). It has been proposed that the phytohormone, cytokinin, plays a positive role in the shoot meristem function, promotes cell expansion and promotes an increasing size of the meristem in Arabidopsis, whereas it has the reverse effects in the root apical meristem (RAM). Over the last few decades, it has been believed that the apically derived auxin suppresses the shoot branching by inactivating the axillary buds. However, it has recently become clear that the mechanism of action of auxinis indirect and multifaceted. In higher plants, the regulatory mechanisms of the SAM formation and organ separation are mostly unknown. This study reviews the effects and functions of cytokinin and auxin at the shoot apical meristem. This study also highlights the merger of the transcription factor activity with the actions of cytokinin/auxin and their complex interactions with the shoot meristem in rice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 132 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 25%
Student > Master 27 20%
Researcher 22 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 9%
Student > Postgraduate 6 4%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 15 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 82 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 18%
Environmental Science 4 3%
Engineering 2 1%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 21 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2015.
All research outputs
#11,909,652
of 15,606,153 outputs
Outputs from Mechanisms of Development
#822
of 995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,448
of 305,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mechanisms of Development
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,153 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 995 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.