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Increased brain response to appetitive tastes in the insula and amygdala in obese compared with healthy weight children when sated

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Obesity, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
Increased brain response to appetitive tastes in the insula and amygdala in obese compared with healthy weight children when sated
Published in
International Journal of Obesity, December 2014
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2014.206
Pubmed ID
Authors

K N Boutelle, C E Wierenga, A Bischoff-Grethe, A J Melrose, E Grenesko-Stevens, M P Paulus, W H Kaye

Abstract

Objective:There is evidence of altered neural taste response in female adolescents who are obese (OB), and in adolescents who are at risk for obesity. To further understand risk factors for the development of overeating and obesity, we investigated response to tastes of sucrose and water in 23 OB and healthy weight (HW) children.Methods and design:Thirteen HW and 10 OB 8-12-year-old children underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while tasting sucrose and water. Additionally, children completed an eating in the absence of hunger paradigm and a sucrose-liking task.Results:A region of interest analysis revealed an elevated BOLD response to taste (sucrose and water) within the bilateral insula and amygdala in OB children relative to HW children. Whole-brain analyses revealed a group by condition interaction within the paracingulate, medial frontal, middle frontal gyri and right amygdala: post hoc analyses suggested an increased response to sucrose for OB relative to HW children, whereas HW children responded more strongly to water relative to sucrose. In addition, OB children, relative to HW, tended to recruit the right putamen as well as medial and lateral frontal and temporal regions bilaterally.Conclusion:This study showed increased reactivity in the amygdala and insula in the OB compared with HW children, but no functional differentiation in the striatum, despite differences in the striatum previously seen in older samples. These findings support the concept of the association between increased neural processing of food reward in the development of obesity, and raise the possibility that emotional and interoceptive sensitivity could be an early vulnerability in obesity.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 13 January 2015; doi:10.1038/ijo.2014.206.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 85 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 26%
Researcher 18 21%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Professor 4 5%
Other 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 30%
Unspecified 16 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 13%
Neuroscience 9 10%
Other 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 133. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2017.
All research outputs
#100,492
of 12,729,985 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Obesity
#76
of 3,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,371
of 291,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Obesity
#1
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,729,985 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,220 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,066 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.