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Alterations in circadian/seasonal rhythms and vegetative functions are related to suicidality in DSM-5 PTSD

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
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Title
Alterations in circadian/seasonal rhythms and vegetative functions are related to suicidality in DSM-5 PTSD
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0352-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liliana Dell’Osso, Gabriele Massimetti, Ciro Conversano, Carlo Antonio Bertelloni, Mauro Giovanni Carta, Valdo Ricca, Claudia Carmassi

Abstract

BackgroundAlterations in rhythmicity and vegetative functions have been reported as correlates of suicidality, particularly in patients with mood disorders. No investigation has addressed their impact on patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Aim of the present study was to fulfill this gap.MethodsSixty-five out- and inpatients with DSM-5 PTSD were assessed by using the Mood Spectrum-Self Report-Lifetime Version (MOODS-SR), a questionnaire for lifetime mood spectrum symptomatology including alterations in circadian/seasonal rhythms and vegetative functions. Six items of the MOODS-SR were combined and dichotomized to assess suicidal ideation and/or attempts.ResultsSignificant and positive associations were found between symptoms of lifetime dysregulations in rhythmicity and vegetative functions and suicidal ideation and/or attempts. All MOODS-SR sub-domains (rhythmicity, sleep, appetite/weight, sexual function, physical symptoms) were associated with an increased likelihood of suicidal ideation, but only changes in appetite/weight were associated with greater odd ratios of suicide attempts (OR¿=¿2.099 95% CI 1.148-3.841).ConclusionsOur results suggest that lifetime dysregulations in rhythmicity and vegetative functions may represent correlates of suicidality in patients with DSM-5 PTSD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 15%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 10 21%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 30%
Psychology 11 23%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2015.
All research outputs
#9,126,870
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,384
of 3,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,952
of 300,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#264
of 366 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,820 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 366 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.