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Clinical and microbiological characteristics of bloodstream infections due to AmpC β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae: an active surveillance cohort in a large centralized Canadian region

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Clinical and microbiological characteristics of bloodstream infections due to AmpC β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae: an active surveillance cohort in a large centralized Canadian region
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0647-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vikas P Chaubey, Johann D D Pitout, Bruce Dalton, Daniel B Gregson, Terry Ross, Kevin B Laupland

Abstract

BackgroundThe objective of this study was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to AmpC producing Enterobacteriaceae (AE) in a large centralized Canadian region over a 9-year period.MethodsAn active surveillance cohort design in Calgary, Canada.ResultsA cohort of 458 episodes of BSIs caused by AE was assembled for analysis. The majority of infections were of nosocomial origin with unknown sources. Enterobacter spp. was the most common species while BSIs due to Serratia spp. had a significant higher mortality when compared to other AE. Delays in empiric or definitive antibiotic therapy were not associated with a difference in outcome. However, patients that did not receive any empiric antimicrobial therapy had increased mortality (3/5; 60% vs. 57/453; 13%; p¿=¿0.018) as did those that did not receive definitive therapy (6/17; 35% vs. 54/441; 12%; p¿=¿0.015).ConclusionsDelays in therapy were not associated with adverse outcomes although lack of active therapy was associated with increased mortality. A strategy for BSIs due to AE where ß-lactam antibiotics (including oxyimino-cephalosporins) are used initially followed by a switch to non-ß-lactam antibiotics once susceptibility results are available is effective.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 16%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 65%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2019.
All research outputs
#5,233,247
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,604
of 6,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,072
of 313,121 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#166
of 637 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,153 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,121 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 637 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.