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Lateral bracing of the tongue during the onset phase of alveolar stops: An EPG study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, December 2014
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Title
Lateral bracing of the tongue during the onset phase of alveolar stops: An EPG study
Published in
Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, December 2014
DOI 10.3109/02699206.2014.991449
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice Lee, Fiona E. Gibbon, Judith Oebels

Abstract

Abstract Although raising the sides of the tongue to form a seal with the palate and upper teeth - lateral bracing - plays a key role in controlling airflow direction, providing overall tongue stability and building up oral pressure during alveolar consonant production, details of this articulatory gesture remain poorly understood. This study examined the dynamics of lateral bracing during the onset of alveolar stops /t/, /d/, /n/ produced by15 typical English-speaking adults using electropalatography. Percent tongue palate contact in the lateral regions over a 150-ms period from the preceding schwa to stop closure was measured. Rapid rising of the sides of the tongue from the back towards the front during the 50-ms period before closure was observed, with oral stops showing significantly more contact than nasal stops. This feature corresponds to well-documented formant transitions detectable from acoustic analysis. Possible explanations for increased contact for oral stops and clinical implications are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Unspecified 1 6%
Lecturer 1 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 6 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Linguistics 1 6%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2014.
All research outputs
#3,164,726
of 4,622,892 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
#123
of 194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,781
of 150,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
#3
of 4 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 194 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.