↓ Skip to main content

Microbial diversity and community structure across environmental gradients in Bransfield Strait, Western Antarctic Peninsula

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, December 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Microbial diversity and community structure across environmental gradients in Bransfield Strait, Western Antarctic Peninsula
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, December 2014
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2014.00647
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camila N. Signori, François Thomas, Alex Enrich-Prast, Ricardo C. G. Pollery, Stefan M. Sievert

Abstract

The Southern Ocean is currently subject to intense investigations, mainly related to its importance for global biogeochemical cycles and its alarming rate of warming in response to climate change. Microbes play an essential role in the functioning of this ecosystem and are the main drivers of the biogeochemical cycling of elements. Yet, the diversity and abundance of microorganisms in this system remain poorly studied, in particular with regards to changes along environmental gradients. Here, we used amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags using primers covering both Bacteria and Archaea to assess the composition and diversity of the microbial communities from four sampling depths (surface, the maximum and minimum of the oxygen concentration, and near the seafloor) at 10 oceanographic stations located in Bransfield Strait [northwest of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP)] and near the sea ice edge (north of the AP). Samples collected near the seafloor and at the oxygen minimum exhibited a higher diversity than those from the surface and oxygen maximum for both bacterial and archaeal communities. The main taxonomic groups identified below 100 m were Thaumarchaeota, Euryarchaeota and Proteobacteria (Gamma-, Delta-, Beta-, and Alphaproteobacteria), whereas in the mixed layer above 100 m Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria (mainly Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria) were found to be dominant. A combination of environmental factors seems to influence the microbial community composition. Our results help to understand how the dynamic seascape of the Southern Ocean shapes the microbial community composition and set a baseline for upcoming studies to evaluate the response of this ecosystem to future changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Finland 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 82 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 30%
Researcher 20 23%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Other 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 45%
Environmental Science 17 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Unspecified 5 6%
Other 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2019.
All research outputs
#7,705,274
of 13,384,384 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#5,327
of 10,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,827
of 297,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#128
of 315 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,384 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,683 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,898 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 315 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.