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Associations of stream geomorphic conditions and prevalence of alternative reproductive tactics among sockeye salmon populations

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Evolutionary Biology, January 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Associations of stream geomorphic conditions and prevalence of alternative reproductive tactics among sockeye salmon populations
Published in
Journal of Evolutionary Biology, January 2018
DOI 10.1111/jeb.13217
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. B. DeFilippo, D. E. Schindler, J. L. Carter, T. E. Walsworth, T. J. Cline, W. A. Larson, T. Buehrens

Abstract

In many species, males may exhibit alternative life histories to circumvent the costs of intrasexual competition and female courtship. While the evolution and underlying genetic and physiological mechanisms behind alternative reproductive tactics are well studied, there has been less consideration of the ecological factors that regulate their prevalence. Here, we examine six decades of age composition records from thirty-six populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) to quantify associations between spawning habitat characteristics and the prevalence of precocious sneakers known as 'jacks'. Jack prevalence was independent of neutral genetic structure among stream populations, but varied among habitat types and as a function of continuous geomorphic characteristics. Jacks were more common in streams relative to beaches and rivers, and their prevalence was negatively associated with stream width, depth, elevation, slope and area, but positively related to bank cover. Behavioral observations showed that jacks made greater use of banks, wood, and shallows than guard males, indicating that their reproductive success depends on the availability of such refuges. Our results emphasize the role of the physical habitat in shaping reproductive tactic frequencies among populations, likely through local adaptation in response to variable fitness expectations under different geomorphic conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 41%
Environmental Science 9 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Unknown 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2018.
All research outputs
#9,709,895
of 17,919,784 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Evolutionary Biology
#1,466
of 2,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,290
of 420,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Evolutionary Biology
#23
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,919,784 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 420,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.