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Photoresistance Switching of Plasmonic Nanopores

Overview of attention for article published in Nano Letters, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 weibo user

Readers on

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Photoresistance Switching of Plasmonic Nanopores
Published in
Nano Letters, December 2014
DOI 10.1021/nl504516d
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yi Li

Abstract

Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼1-2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Germany 1 2%
Taiwan 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Unknown 50 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 35%
Student > Master 9 16%
Researcher 7 12%
Unspecified 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 16 28%
Engineering 16 28%
Chemistry 9 16%
Unspecified 6 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Other 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2014.
All research outputs
#5,593,167
of 10,563,774 outputs
Outputs from Nano Letters
#3,928
of 5,833 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,176
of 242,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nano Letters
#70
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,563,774 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,833 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,569 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.