↓ Skip to main content

Recovery of large carnivores in Europe’s modern human-dominated landscapes

Overview of attention for article published in Science, December 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
82 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
455 tweeters
facebook
43 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
444 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Recovery of large carnivores in Europe’s modern human-dominated landscapes
Published in
Science, December 2014
DOI 10.1126/science.1257553
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guillaume Chapron, Petra Kaczensky, John D. C. Linnell, Manuela von Arx, Djuro Huber, Henrik Andrén, José Vicente López-Bao, Michal Adamec, Francisco Álvares, Ole Anders, Linas Balčiauskas, Vaidas Balys, Péter Bedő, Ferdinand Bego, Juan Carlos Blanco, Urs Breitenmoser, Henrik Brøseth, Luděk Bufka, Raimonda Bunikyte, Paolo Ciucci, Alexander Dutsov, Thomas Engleder, Christian Fuxjäger, Claudio Groff, Katja Holmala, Bledi Hoxha, Yorgos Iliopoulos, Ovidiu Ionescu, Jasna Jeremić, Klemen Jerina, Gesa Kluth, Felix Knauer, Ilpo Kojola, Ivan Kos, Miha Krofel, Jakub Kubala, Saša Kunovac, Josip Kusak, Miroslav Kutal, Olof Liberg, Aleksandra Majić, Peep Männil, Ralph Manz, Eric Marboutin, Francesca Marucco, Dime Melovski, Kujtim Mersini, Yorgos Mertzanis, Robert W. Mysłajek, Sabina Nowak, John Odden, Janis Ozolins, Guillermo Palomero, Milan Paunović, Jens Persson, Hubert Potočnik, Pierre-Yves Quenette, Georg Rauer, Ilka Reinhardt, Robin Rigg, Andreas Ryser, Valeria Salvatori, Tomaž Skrbinšek, Aleksandar Stojanov, Jon E. Swenson, László Szemethy, Aleksandër Trajçe, Elena Tsingarska-Sedefcheva, Martin Váňa, Rauno Veeroja, Petter Wabakken, Manfred Wölfl, Sybille Wölfl, Fridolin Zimmermann, Diana Zlatanova, Luigi Boitani

Abstract

The conservation of large carnivores is a formidable challenge for biodiversity conservation. Using a data set on the past and current status of brown bears (Ursus arctos), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), gray wolves (Canis lupus), and wolverines (Gulo gulo) in European countries, we show that roughly one-third of mainland Europe hosts at least one large carnivore species, with stable or increasing abundance in most cases in 21st-century records. The reasons for this overall conservation success include protective legislation, supportive public opinion, and a variety of practices making coexistence between large carnivores and people possible. The European situation reveals that large carnivores and people can share the same landscape.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 455 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 444 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 2%
Spain 6 1%
France 5 1%
United Kingdom 5 1%
Germany 4 <1%
Italy 4 <1%
Austria 4 <1%
India 4 <1%
Portugal 3 <1%
Other 17 4%
Unknown 382 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 110 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 108 24%
Student > Master 72 16%
Student > Bachelor 39 9%
Other 32 7%
Other 83 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 253 57%
Environmental Science 115 26%
Unspecified 23 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 2%
Other 33 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1081. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,670
of 8,613,749 outputs
Outputs from Science
#98
of 42,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50
of 243,478 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#7
of 741 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,613,749 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 42,486 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,478 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 741 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.