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Seasonal weather patterns drive population vital rates and persistence in a stream fish

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
114 Mendeley
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Title
Seasonal weather patterns drive population vital rates and persistence in a stream fish
Published in
Global Change Biology, February 2015
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12837
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoichiro Kanno, Benjamin H. Letcher, Nathaniel P. Hitt, David A. Boughton, John E. B. Wofford, Elise F. Zipkin

Abstract

Climate change affects seasonal weather patterns, but little is known about the relative importance of seasonal weather patterns on animal population vital rates. Even when such information exists, data are typically only available from intensive fieldwork (e.g. mark-recapture studies) at a limited spatial extent. Here we investigated effects of seasonal air temperature and precipitation (fall, winter and spring) on survival and recruitment of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) at a broad spatial scale using a novel stage-structured population model. The data were a 15-year record of brook trout abundance from 72 sites distributed across a 170-km long mountain range in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA. Population vital rates responded differently to weather and site-specific conditions. Specifically, young-of-year survival was most strongly affected by spring temperature, adult survival by elevation, and per-capita recruitment by winter precipitation. Low fall precipitation and high winter precipitation, the latter of which is predicted to increase under climate change for the study region, had the strongest negative effects on trout populations. Simulations show that trout abundance could be greatly reduced under constant high winter precipitation, consistent with the expected effects of gravel-scouring flows on eggs and newly hatched individuals. However, high-elevation sites were less vulnerable to local extinction because they supported higher adult survival. Furthermore, the majority of brook trout populations are projected to persist if high winter precipitation occur only intermittently (≤ 3 out of 5 years) due to density-dependent recruitment. Variable drivers of vital rates should be commonly found in animal populations characterized by ontogenetic changes in habitat, and such stage-structured effects may increase population persistence to changing climate by not affecting all life stages simultaneously. Yet, our results also demonstrate that weather patterns during seemingly less consequential seasons (e.g. winter precipitation) can have major impacts on animal population dynamics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Spain 2 2%
Mexico 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 107 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 30%
Researcher 26 23%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Professor 6 5%
Other 16 14%
Unknown 5 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 48%
Environmental Science 37 32%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Engineering 3 3%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 11 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,531,874
of 15,135,521 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#2,551
of 4,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,482
of 302,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#67
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,135,521 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,085 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,661 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.