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Markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition reflect tumor biology according to patient age and Gleason score in prostate cancer

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2017
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Title
Markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition reflect tumor biology according to patient age and Gleason score in prostate cancer
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0188842
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dorota Jędroszka, Magdalena Orzechowska, Raneem Hamouz, Karolina Górniak, Andrzej K. Bednarek

Abstract

Prostate carcinoma (PRAD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies amongst men worldwide. It is well-known that androgen receptor (AR) plays a pivotal role in a vast majority of prostate tumors. However, recent evidence emerged stating that estrogen receptors (ERs) may also contribute to prostate tumor development. Moreover, progression and aggressiveness of prostate cancer may be associated with differential expression genes of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Therefore we aimed to assess the significance of receptors status as well as EMT marker genes expression among PRAD patients in accordance to their age and Gleason score. We analyzed TCGA gene expression profiles of 497 prostate tumor samples according to 43 genes involved in EMT and 3 hormone receptor genes (AR, ESR1, ESR2) as well as clinical characteristic of cancer patients. Then patients were divided into four groups according to their age and 5 groups according to Gleason score. Next, we evaluated PRAD samples according to relationship between the set of variables in different combinations and compared differential expression in subsequent groups of patients. The analysis was applied using R packages: FactoMineR, gplots, RColorBrewer and NMF. MFA analysis resulted in distinct grouping of PRAD patients into four age categories according to expression level of AR, ESR1 and ESR2 with the most distinct group of age less than 50 years old. Further investigations indicated opposite expression profiles of EMT markers between different age groups as well as strong association of EMT gene expression with Gleason score. We found that depending on age of prostate cancer patients and Gleason score EMT genes with distinctly altered expression are: KRT18, KRT19, MUC1 and COL4A1, CTNNB1, SNAI2, ZEB1 and MMP3. Our major observation is that prostate cancer from patients under 50 years old compared to older ones has entirely different EMT gene expression profiles showing potentially more aggressive invasive phenotype, despite Gleason score classification.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Decision Sciences 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 6 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,786,177
of 12,247,570 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#99,375
of 134,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#244,643
of 341,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#3,120
of 4,671 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,247,570 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 134,105 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,887 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,671 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.