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Peer teacher training (PTT) program for health professional students: interprofessional and flipped learning

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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80 Mendeley
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Title
Peer teacher training (PTT) program for health professional students: interprofessional and flipped learning
Published in
BMC Medical Education, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-017-1037-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annette Burgess, Chris Roberts, Christie van Diggele, Craig Mellis

Abstract

The need for developing healthcare professional students' peer teaching skills is widely acknowledged, and a number of discipline-based peer teacher training programs have been previously reported. However, a consensus on what a student peer teaching skills program across the health professions should entail, and the associated benefits and challenges, has not been previously described. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the design and implementation of an interprofessional Peer Teacher Training (PTT) program, and explore outcomes and participant perceptions, using Experience-Based Learning (ExBL) theory. In 2016, an interprofessional team of academics from across three healthcare faculties: Medicine, Pharmacy and Health Sciences, developed and implemented a six module, flipped learning, interprofessional PTT program. Pre- and post questionnaires, using a Likert scale of 1-5, as well as open ended questions, were distributed to students. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data, and thematic analysis was used to analyse qualitative data. Ninety senior students from across the three faculties participated. Eighty nine percent of participants completed a pre- and post-course questionnaire. Students felt the required pre-class preparation, including online pre-reading, discussion board, videos, and teaching activities enhanced their face-to-face learning experience. In class, students valued the small-group activities, and the opportunities to practice their teaching skills with provision of feedback. Students reported increased confidence to plan and deliver peer teaching activities, and an increased awareness of the roles and responsibilities of health professionals outside of their own discipline, and use of different terminology and communication methods. Students' suggestions for improving the PTT, included; less large group teaching; more online delivery of theory; and inclusion of a wider range of health professional disciplines. The PTT program provided a theoretically informed framework where students could develop and practice their teaching skills, helping to shape students' professional values as they assume peer teaching responsibilities and move towards healthcare practice. The flipped learning, interprofessional format was successful in developing students' skills, competence and confidence in teaching, assessment, communication and feedback. Importantly, participation increased students' awareness and understanding of the various roles of health professionals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 80 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 19%
Student > Master 14 18%
Lecturer 7 9%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 16 20%
Unknown 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 13%
Social Sciences 10 13%
Psychology 4 5%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 21 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2017.
All research outputs
#2,928,670
of 12,269,011 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#510
of 1,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,578
of 344,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#38
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,011 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,676 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,231 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.