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Functional Neuroimaging of Avoidance Habits in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Psychiatry, December 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Citations

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74 Dimensions

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120 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Functional Neuroimaging of Avoidance Habits in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.
Published in
American Journal of Psychiatry, December 2014
DOI 10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.14040525
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire M. Gillan, Gillan CM, Apergis-Schoute AM, Morein-Zamir S, Urcelay GP, Sule A, Fineberg NA, Sahakian BJ, Robbins TW, Annemieke M. Apergis-Schoute, Sharon Morein-Zamir, Gonzalo P. Urcelay, Akeem Sule, Naomi A. Fineberg, Barbara J. Sahakian, Trevor W. Robbins

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the neural correlates of excessive habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The authors aimed to test for neurobiological convergence with the known pathophysiology of OCD and to infer, based on abnormalities in brain activation, whether these habits arise from dysfunction in the goal-directed or habit system. Method: Thirty-seven OCD patients and 33 healthy comparison subjects learned to avoid shocks while undergoing a functional MRI scan. Following four blocks of training, the authors tested whether the avoidance response had become a habit by removing the threat of shock and measuring continued avoidance. Task-related differences in brain activity in three regions of interest (the caudate, the putamen, and the medial orbitofrontal cortex) were tested at a statistical threshold set at <0.05 (family-wise-error corrected). Results: Excessive habit formation in OCD patients, which was associated with hyperactivation in the caudate, was observed. Activation in this region was also associated with subjective ratings of increased urge to perform habits. The OCD group, as a whole, showed hyperactivation in the medial orbitofrontal cortex during the acquisition of avoidance; however, this did not relate directly to habit formation. Conclusions: OCD patients exhibited excessive habits that were associated with hyperactivation in a key region implicated in the pathophysiology of OCD, the caudate nucleus. Previous studies indicate that this region is important for goal-directed behavior, suggesting that habit-forming biases in OCD may be a result of impairments in this system, rather than differences in the buildup of stimulus-response habits themselves.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Unknown 114 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 20%
Student > Master 17 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 31 26%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 42 35%
Neuroscience 24 20%
Unspecified 18 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 8%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2016.
All research outputs
#112,898
of 11,473,233 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Psychiatry
#124
of 5,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,090
of 253,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Psychiatry
#1
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,473,233 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,729 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.