↓ Skip to main content

Ventricular septal defect

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, December 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
133 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Ventricular septal defect
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13023-014-0144-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diane E Spicer, Hao H Hsu, Jennifer Co-Vu, Robert H Anderson, F Jay Fricker

Abstract

BackgroundVentricular septal defects are the commonest congenital cardiac malformations. They can exist in isolation, but are also found as integral components of other cardiac anomalies, such as tetralogy of Fallot, double outlet right ventricle, or common arterial trunk. As yet, there is no agreement on how best to classify such defects, nor even on the curved surface that is taken to represent the defect.MethodsBased on our previous pathological and clinical experiences, we have reviewed the history of classification of holes between the ventricles. We proposed that the defects are best defined as representing the area of deficient ventricular septation. This then permits the recognition of clinically significant variants according to the anatomic borders, and the way the curved surface representing the area of deficient septation opens into the morphologically right ventricle.ResultsClinical manifestation depends on the size of the defect, and on the relationship between systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances. Symptoms include failure to thrive, along with the manifestations of the increase in flow of blood to the lungs. Diagnosis can be made by physical examination, but is confirmed by echocardiographic interrogation, which delineates the precise anatomy, and also provides the physiologic information required for optimal clinical decision-making. Cardiac catheterization offers additional information regarding hemodynamics, particularly if there is a concern regarding an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Hemodynamic assessment is rarely necessary to make decisions regarding management, although it can be helpful if assessing symptomatic adults with hemodynamically restrictive defects. In infants with defects producing large shunts, surgical closure is now recommended in most instances as soon as symptoms manifest. Only in rare cases is palliative banding of the pulmonary trunk now recommended. Closure with devices inserted on catheters is now the preferred approach for many patients with muscular defects, often using a hybrid procedure. Therapeutic closure should now be anticipated with virtually zero mortality, and with excellent anticipated long-term survival.ConclusionVentricular septal defects are best defined as representing the borders of the area of deficient ventricular septation. An approach on this basis permits recognition of the clinically significant phenotypic variants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 132 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 50 38%
Student > Master 21 16%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 5%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 22 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 65 49%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 5%
Engineering 4 3%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 24 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2015.
All research outputs
#2,491,160
of 5,036,026 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#511
of 858 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,302
of 177,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#29
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,026 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 858 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,659 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.