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An Australian Aboriginal birth cohort: a unique resource for a life course study of an Indigenous population. A study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC International Health and Human Rights, March 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
70 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
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Title
An Australian Aboriginal birth cohort: a unique resource for a life course study of an Indigenous population. A study protocol
Published in
BMC International Health and Human Rights, March 2003
DOI 10.1186/1472-698x-3-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan M Sayers, Dorothy Mackerras, Gurmeet Singh, Ingrid Bucens, Kathryn Flynn, Alison Reid

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The global rise of Type 2 diabetes and its complications has drawn attention to the burden of non-communicable diseases on populations undergoing epidemiological transition. The life course approach of a birth cohort has the potential to increase our understanding of the development of these chronic diseases. In 1987 we sought to establish an Australian Indigenous birth cohort to be used as a resource for descriptive and analytical studies with particular attention on non-communicable diseases. The focus of this report is the methodology of recruiting and following-up an Aboriginal birth cohort of mobile subjects belonging to diverse cultural and language groups living in a large sparsely populated area in the Top End of the Northern Territory of Australia. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study of Aboriginal singletons born at the Royal Darwin Hospital 1987-1990, with second wave cross-sectional follow-up examination of subjects 1998-2001 in over 70 different locations. A multiphase protocol was used to locate and collect data on 686 subjects with different approaches for urban and rural children. Manual chart audits, faxes to remote communities, death registries and a full time subject locator with past experience of Aboriginal communities were all used. DISCUSSION: The successful recruitment of 686 Indigenous subjects followed up 14 years later with vital status determined for 95% of subjects and examination of 86% shows an Indigenous birth cohort can be established in an environment with geographic, cultural and climatic challenges. The high rates of recruitment and follow up indicate there were effective strategies of follow-up in a supportive population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Cameroon 1 1%
Malawi 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 86 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Master 7 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 6%
Other 4 4%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 3%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 53 60%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 24%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Mathematics 2 2%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 55 62%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2014.
All research outputs
#4,763,542
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#205
of 394 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,611
of 312,713 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#22
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 394 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,713 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.