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Physicians using spinal manipulative treatment in The Netherlands: a description of their characteristics and their patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2017
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Title
Physicians using spinal manipulative treatment in The Netherlands: a description of their characteristics and their patients
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1863-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wouter Schuller, Raymond W. J. G. Ostelo, Daphne C. Rohrich, Adri T. Apeldoorn, Henrica C. W. de Vet

Abstract

Various health care professionals apply Spinal Manipulative Treatment (SMT) in daily practice. While the characteristics of chiropractors and manual therapists and the characteristics of their patient populations are well described, there is little research about physicians who use SMT techniques. A distinct group of physicians in The Netherlands has been trained in musculoskeletal (MSK) medicine, which includes the use of SMT. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of these physicians and their patient population. All registered MSK physicians were approached with questionnaires and telephone interviews to collect data about their characteristics. Data about patient characteristics were extracted from a web-based register. In this register physicians recorded basic patient data (age, gender, the type and duration of the main complaint, concomitant complaints and the type of referral) at the first consultation. Patients were invited to fill in web-based questionnaires to provide baseline data about previous treatments and the severity of their main complaint. Functional impairment was measured with Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs). Questionnaires were sent to 138 physicians of whom 90 responded (65%). Most physicians were trained in MSK medicine after a career in other medical specialities. They reported to combine their SMT treatment with a variety of diagnostic and treatment options part of which were only permissible for physicians, such as prescription medication and injections. The majority of patients presented with complaints of long duration (62.1% > 1 year), most frequently low back pain (48.1%) or neck pain (16.9%), with mean scores of 6.0 and 6.2, respectively, on a 0 to10 numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain intensity. Mean scores on all PROMs showed moderate impairment. Patients most frequently reported previous treatment by physical therapists (68.1%), manual therapists (37.7%) or chiropractors (17.0%). Our study showed that MSK physicians in The Netherlands used an array of SMT techniques. They embedded their SMT techniques in a broad array of other diagnostic and treatment options, part of which were limited to medical doctors. Most patients consulted MSK physicians with spinal pain of long duration with moderate functional impairment.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 28%
Student > Master 5 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 22%
Researcher 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 22%
Psychology 1 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,799,331
of 12,265,937 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,921
of 2,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#245,489
of 343,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#107
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,265,937 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,673 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.