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The contribution of TMS–EEG coregistration in the exploration of the human cortical connectome

Overview of attention for article published in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
100 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
315 Mendeley
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Title
The contribution of TMS–EEG coregistration in the exploration of the human cortical connectome
Published in
Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, February 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2014.12.014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marta Bortoletto, Domenica Veniero, Gregor Thut, Carlo Miniussi

Abstract

Recent developments in neuroscience have emphasised the importance of integrated distributed networks of brain areas for successful cognitive functioning. Our current understanding is that the brain has a modular organisation in which segregated networks supporting specialised processing are linked through a few long-range connections, ensuring processing integration. Although such architecture is structurally stable, it appears to be flexible in its functioning, enabling long-range connections to regulate the information flow and facilitate communication among the relevant modules, depending on the contingent cognitive demands. Here we show how insights brought by the coregistration of transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) integrate and support recent models of functional brain architecture. Moreover, we will highlight the types of data that can be obtained through TMS-EEG, such as the timing of signal propagation, the excitatory/inhibitory nature of connections and causality. Last, we will discuss recent emerging applications of TMS-EEG in the study of brain disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 315 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
France 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Serbia 1 <1%
Unknown 302 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 23%
Researcher 60 19%
Student > Master 37 12%
Student > Bachelor 27 9%
Student > Postgraduate 21 7%
Other 54 17%
Unknown 45 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 91 29%
Psychology 59 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 12%
Engineering 22 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 5%
Other 22 7%
Unknown 68 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,218,544
of 12,702,022 outputs
Outputs from Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
#818
of 2,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,109
of 290,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
#12
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,702,022 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,317 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,437 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.