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Accelerated development of supramolecular corneal stromal-like assemblies from corneal fibroblasts in the presence of macromolecular crowders.

Overview of attention for article published in Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods, December 2014
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Title
Accelerated development of supramolecular corneal stromal-like assemblies from corneal fibroblasts in the presence of macromolecular crowders.
Published in
Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods, December 2014
DOI 10.1089/ten.tec.2014.0387
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pramod Kumar, Abhigyan Satyam, Xingliang Fan, Yury Rochev, Brian J Rodriguez, Alexander Gorelov, Lokesh Joshi, Michael Raghunath, Abhay Pandit, Dimitrios I Zeugolis, Kumar P, Satyam A, Fan X, Rochev Y, Rodriguez BJ, Gorelov A, Joshi L, Raghunath M, Pandit A, Zeugolis DI, Kumar, Pramod, Satyam, Abhigyan, Fan, Xingliang, Rochev, Yury, Rodriguez, Brian J., Gorelov, Alexander, Joshi, Lokesh, Raghunath, Michael, Pandit, Abhay, Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

Abstract

Tissue engineering by self-assembly uses the cells' secretome as a regeneration template and biological factory of trophic factors. Despite the several advantages that have been witnessed in preclinical and clinical setting, the major obstacle for wide acceptance of this technology remains the tardy extracellular matrix formation. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding / excluding volume effect, a biophysical phenomenon that accelerates thermodynamic activities and biological processes by several orders of magnitude, in human corneal fibroblast culture. Our data indicate that the addition of negatively charged galactose derivative (carrageenan) in human corneal fibroblast culture, even at 0.5% serum, increases by 12-fold tissue-specific matrix deposition, whilst maintaining physiological cell morphology and protein / gene expression. Gene analysis indicates that a glucose derivative (dextran sulphate) may drive corneal fibroblasts towards a myofibroblast lineage. Collectively, these results indicate that macromolecular crowding may be suitable not only for clinical translation and commercialisation of tissue engineering by self-assembly therapies, but also for the development of in vitro pathophysiology models.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 20%
Professor 5 17%
Unspecified 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Other 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 33%
Unspecified 8 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Engineering 4 13%
Materials Science 2 7%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#5,626,710
of 7,435,912 outputs
Outputs from Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods
#131
of 221 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,801
of 235,914 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods
#8
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,435,912 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 221 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,914 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.