↓ Skip to main content

Parallel loss of introns in the ABCB1 gene in angiosperms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
6 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Parallel loss of introns in the ABCB1 gene in angiosperms
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1077-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajiv K. Parvathaneni, Victoria L. DeLeo, John J. Spiekerman, Debkanta Chakraborty, Katrien M. Devos

Abstract

The presence of non-coding introns is a characteristic feature of most eukaryotic genes. While the size of the introns, number of introns per gene and the number of intron-containing genes can vary greatly between sequenced eukaryotic genomes, the structure of a gene with reference to intron presence and positions is typically conserved in closely related species. Unexpectedly, the ABCB1 (ATP-Binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1) gene which encodes a P-glycoprotein and underlies dwarfing traits in maize (br2), sorghum (dw3) and pearl millet (d2) displayed considerable variation in intron composition. An analysis of the ABCB1 gene structure in 80 angiosperms revealed that the number of introns ranged from one to nine. All introns in ABCB1 underwent either a one-time loss (single loss in one lineage/species) or multiple independent losses (parallel loss in two or more lineages/species) with the majority of losses occurring within the grass family. In contrast, the structure of the closest homolog to ABCB1, ABCB19, remained constant in the majority of angiosperms analyzed. Using known phylogenetic relationships within the grasses, we determined the ancestral branch-points where the losses occurred. Intron 7, the longest intron, was lost in only a single species, Mimulus guttatus, following duplication of ABCB1. Semiquantitative PCR showed that the M. guttatus ABCB1 gene copy without intron 7 had significantly lower transcript levels than the gene copy with intron 7. We further demonstrated that intron 7 carried two motifs that were highly conserved across the monocot-dicot divide. The ABCB1 gene structure is highly dynamic, while the structure of ABCB19 remained largely conserved through evolution. Precise removal of introns, preferential removal of smaller introns and presence of at least 2 bp of microhomology flanking most introns indicated that intron loss may have predominantly occurred through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair of double strand breaks. Lack of microhomology in the exon upstream of lost phase I introns was likely due to release of the selective constraint on the penultimate base (3rd base in codon) of the terminal codon by the splicing machinery. In addition to size, the presence of regulatory motifs will make introns recalcitrant to loss.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 33%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Professor 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 83%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,382,732
of 12,298,022 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,669
of 2,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,847
of 345,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#70
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,298,022 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,299 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.