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Effects of healthcare professional delivered early feeding interventions on feeding practices and dietary intake: A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Appetite, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
28 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
Title
Effects of healthcare professional delivered early feeding interventions on feeding practices and dietary intake: A systematic review
Published in
Appetite, April 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2017.12.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Matvienko-Sikar, Elaine Toomey, Lisa Delaney, Janas Harrington, Molly Byrne, Patricia M. Kearney

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a global public health challenge. Parental feeding practices, such as responsive feeding, are implicated in the etiology of childhood obesity. This systematic review aimed to examine of effects of healthcare professional-delivered early feeding interventions, on parental feeding practices, dietary intake, and weight outcomes for children up to 2 years. The role of responsive feeding interventions was also specifically examined. Databases searched included: CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, and Maternity and Infant Care. participants are parents of children ≤2 years; intervention includes focus on early child feeding to prevent overweight and obesity; intervention delivered by healthcare professionals. Sixteen papers, representing 10 trials, met inclusion criteria for review. Six interventions included responsive feeding components. Interventions demonstrated inconsistent effects on feeding practices, dietary intake, and weight outcomes. Findings suggest some reductions in pressure to eat and infant consumption of non-core beverages. Responsive feeding based interventions demonstrate greater improvements in feeding approaches, and weight outcomes. The findings of this review highlight the importance of incorporating responsive feeding in healthcare professional delivered early feeding interventions to prevent childhood obesity. Observed inconsistencies across trials may be explained by methodological limitations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 13 18%
Student > Master 13 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 15%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 18 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 19 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 24%
Unspecified 16 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2018.
All research outputs
#743,657
of 12,521,852 outputs
Outputs from Appetite
#584
of 2,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,786
of 381,762 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Appetite
#18
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,521,852 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,994 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 381,762 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.