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Neural correlates of lexical-semantic memory: A voxel-based morphometry study in mild AD, aMCI and normal aging

Overview of attention for article published in Dementia & Neuropsychologia, June 2011
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Title
Neural correlates of lexical-semantic memory: A voxel-based morphometry study in mild AD, aMCI and normal aging
Published in
Dementia & Neuropsychologia, June 2011
DOI 10.1590/s1980-57642011dn05020003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcio L.F. Balthazar, Clarissa L. Yasuda, Tátila M. Lopes, Fabrício R.S. Pereira, Benito Pereira Damasceno, Fernando Cendes

Abstract

Neuroanatomical correlations of naming and lexical-semantic memory are not yet fully understood. The most influential approaches share the view that semantic representations reflect the manner in which information has been acquired through perception and action, and that each brain area processes different modalities of semantic representations. Despite these anatomical differences in semantic processing, generalization across different features that have similar semantic significance is one of the main characteristics of human cognition. We evaluated the brain regions related to naming, and to the semantic generalization, of visually presented drawings of objects from the Boston Naming Test (BNT), which comprises different categories, such as animals, vegetables, tools, food, and furniture. In order to create a model of lesion method, a sample of 48 subjects presenting with a continuous decline both in cognitive functions, including naming skills, and in grey matter density (GMD) was compared to normal young adults with normal aging, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Semantic errors on the BNT, as well as naming performance, were correlated with whole brain GMD as measured by voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The areas most strongly related to naming and to semantic errors were the medial temporal structures, thalami, superior and inferior temporal gyri, especially their anterior parts, as well as prefrontal cortices (inferior and superior frontal gyri). The possible role of each of these areas in the lexical-semantic networks was discussed, along with their contribution to the models of semantic memory organization.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 11%
Unknown 16 89%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2017.
All research outputs
#16,498,373
of 20,520,938 outputs
Outputs from Dementia & Neuropsychologia
#196
of 228 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#323,733
of 437,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Dementia & Neuropsychologia
#19
of 19 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.