↓ Skip to main content

Intracellular Iron Transport and Storage: From Molecular Mechanisms to Health Implications

Overview of attention for article published in Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, June 2008
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
patent
2 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
283 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Intracellular Iron Transport and Storage: From Molecular Mechanisms to Health Implications
Published in
Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, June 2008
DOI 10.1089/ars.2007.1893
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth L. Mackenzie, Kenta Iwasaki, Yoshiaki Tsuji

Abstract

Maintenance of proper "labile iron" levels is a critical component in preserving homeostasis. Iron is a vital element that is a constituent of a number of important macromolecules, including those involved in energy production, respiration, DNA synthesis, and metabolism; however, excess "labile iron" is potentially detrimental to the cell or organism or both because of its propensity to participate in oxidation-reduction reactions that generate harmful free radicals. Because of this dual nature, elaborate systems tightly control the concentration of available iron. Perturbation of normal physiologic iron concentrations may be both a cause and a consequence of cellular damage and disease states. This review highlights the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulation of iron absorption, transport, and storage through the roles of key regulatory proteins, including ferroportin, hepcidin, ferritin, and frataxin. In addition, we present an overview of the relation between iron regulation and oxidative stress and we discuss the role of functional iron overload in the pathogenesis of hemochromatosis, neurodegeneration, and inflammation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 283 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 275 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 64 23%
Student > Master 54 19%
Student > Bachelor 33 12%
Researcher 32 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 6%
Other 53 19%
Unknown 31 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 65 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 54 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 51 18%
Chemistry 33 12%
Engineering 7 2%
Other 35 12%
Unknown 38 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2016.
All research outputs
#2,385,781
of 14,460,564 outputs
Outputs from Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
#142
of 1,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,551
of 298,890 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antioxidants & Redox Signaling
#4
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,460,564 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,327 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,890 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.