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Borrelia burgdorferi Promotes the Establishment of Babesia microti in the Northeastern United States

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
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Title
Borrelia burgdorferi Promotes the Establishment of Babesia microti in the Northeastern United States
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0115494
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica M. Dunn, Peter J. Krause, Stephen Davis, Edouard G. Vannier, Meagan C. Fitzpatrick, Lindsay Rollend, Alexia A. Belperron, Sarah L. States, Andrew Stacey, Linda K. Bockenstedt, Durland Fish, Maria A. Diuk-Wasser

Abstract

Babesia microti and Borrelia burgdorferi, the respective causative agents of human babesiosis and Lyme disease, are maintained in their enzootic cycles by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and use the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) as primary reservoir host. The geographic range of both pathogens has expanded in the United States, but the spread of babesiosis has lagged behind that of Lyme disease. Several studies have estimated the basic reproduction number (R0) for B. microti to be below the threshold for persistence (<1), a finding that is inconsistent with the persistence and geographic expansion of this pathogen. We tested the hypothesis that host coinfection with B. burgdorferi increases the likelihood of B. microti transmission and establishment in new areas. We fed I. scapularis larva on P. leucopus mice that had been infected in the laboratory with B. microti and/or B. burgdorferi. We observed that coinfection in mice increases the frequency of B. microti infected ticks. To identify the ecological variables that would increase the probability of B. microti establishment in the field, we integrated our laboratory data with field data on tick burden and feeding activity in an R0 model. Our model predicts that high prevalence of B. burgdorferi infected mice lowers the ecological threshold for B. microti establishment, especially at sites where larval burden on P. leucopus is lower and where larvae feed simultaneously or soon after nymphs infect mice, when most of the transmission enhancement due to coinfection occurs. Our studies suggest that B. burgdorferi contributes to the emergence and expansion of B. microti and provides a model to predict the ecological factors that are sufficient for emergence of B. microti in the wild.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Mathematics 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 66. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2019.
All research outputs
#283,169
of 14,155,179 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#5,183
of 148,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,332
of 297,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#106
of 2,062 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,155,179 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 148,006 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,062 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.