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Demographic drivers of a refugee species: large-scale experiments guide strategies for reintroductions of hirola

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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20 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Demographic drivers of a refugee species: large-scale experiments guide strategies for reintroductions of hirola
Published in
Ecological Applications, February 2018
DOI 10.1002/eap.1664
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdullahi H. Ali, Matthew J. Kauffman, Rajan Amin, Amos Kibara, Juliet King, David Mallon, Charles Musyoki, Jacob R. Goheen

Abstract

Effective reintroduction strategies require accurate estimates of vital rates and the factors that influence them. The hirola (Beatragus hunteri) is the rarest antelope on Earth, with a global population size of <500 individuals restricted to the Kenya-Somali border. We estimated vital rates of hirola populations exposed to varying levels of predation and rangeland quality from 2012 to 2015, and then built population matrices to estimate the finite rate of population change (λ) and demographic sensitivities. Mean survival for all age classes and population growth was highest in the low predation/high-rangeland quality setting (λ = 1.08 ± 0.03 SE), and lowest in the high predation/low-rangeland quality setting (λ = 0.70 ± 0.22 SE). Retrospective demographic analyses revealed that increased fecundity (the number of female calves born to adult females annually) and female calf survival were responsible for higher population growth where large carnivores were absent. In contrast, variation in adult female survival was the primary contributor to differences in population growth attributable to rangeland quality. Our analyses suggest that hirola demography is driven by a combination of top-down (predation) and bottom-up (rangeland quality) forces, with populations in the contemporary geographic range impacted both by declining rangeland quality and predation. To enhance the chances of successful reintroductions, conservationists can consider rangeland restoration to boost both the survival and fecundity of adult females within the hirola's historical range. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 12 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 26%
Environmental Science 7 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 15 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2019.
All research outputs
#2,352,393
of 19,298,685 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#650
of 2,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,064
of 428,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#16
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,298,685 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,952 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 428,470 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.