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Evidence of hidden leprosy in a supposedly low endemic area of Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence of hidden leprosy in a supposedly low endemic area of Brazil
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, December 2017
DOI 10.1590/0074-02760170173
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fred Bernardes Filho, Natália Aparecida de Paula, Marcel Nani Leite, Thania Loyola Cordeiro Abi-Rached, Sebastian Vernal, Moises Batista da Silva, Josafá Gonçalves Barreto, John Stewart Spencer, Marco Andrey Cipriani Frade

Abstract

Show that hidden endemic leprosy exists in a municipality of inner São Paulo state (Brazil) with active surveillance actions based on clinical and immunological evaluations. The study sample was composed by people randomly selected by a dermatologist during medical care in the public emergency department and by active surveillance carried out during two days at a mobile clinic. All subjects received a dermato-neurological examination and blood sampling to determine anti-PGL-I antibody titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). From July to December 2015, 24 new cases of leprosy were diagnosed; all were classified as multibacillary (MB) leprosy, one with severe Lucio's phenomenon. Seventeen (75%) were found with grade-1 or 2 disability at the moment of diagnosis. Anti-PGL-I titer was positive in 31/133 (23.3%) individuals, only 6/24 (25%) were positive in newly diagnosed leprosy cases. During the last ten years before this study, the average new case detection rate (NCDR) in this town was 2.62/100,000 population. After our work, the NCDR was raised to 42.8/100,000. These results indicate a very high number of hidden leprosy cases in this supposedly low endemic area of Brazil.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 24%
Student > Master 9 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Researcher 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 7 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,140,624
of 15,915,455 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#730
of 1,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,495
of 410,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#12
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,915,455 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,137 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 410,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.