↓ Skip to main content

Moving from information and collaboration to action: report from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, Paris in April 2017

Overview of attention for article published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Moving from information and collaboration to action: report from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, Paris in April 2017
Published in
Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40575-017-0054-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dan G. O’Neill, Sylvia F. A. Keijser, Åke Hedhammar, Caroline Kisko, Gregoire Leroy, Aimée Llewellyn-Zaidi, Sofia Malm, Patricia N. Olson, Rowena M. A. Packer, Jean Francois Rousselot, Ian J. Seath, Jason W. Stull, Brenda N. Bonnett

Abstract

Breed-related health problems in dogs have received increased focus over the last decade. Responsibility for causing and/or solving these problems has been variously directed towards dog breeders and kennel clubs, the veterinary profession, welfare scientists, owners, regulators, insurance companies and the media. In reality, all these stakeholders are likely to share some responsibility and optimal progress on resolving these challenges requires all key stakeholders to work together. The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD), together with an alternating host organization, holds biennial meetings called the International Dog Health Workshops (IDHW). The Société Centrale Canine (French Kennel Club) hosted the 3rd IDHW, in Paris, in April, 2017. These meetings bring together a wide range of stakeholders in dog health, science and welfare to improve international sharing of information and resources, to provide a forum for ongoing collaboration, and to identify specific needs and actions to improve health, well-being and welfare in dogs. The workshop included 140 participants from 23 countries and was structured around six important issues facing those who work to improve dog health. These included individualized breed-specific strategies for health and breeding, extreme conformations, education and communication in relation to antimicrobial resistance, behavior and welfare, genetic testing and population-based evidence. A number of exciting actions were agreed during the meeting. These included setting up working groups to create tools to help breed clubs accelerate the implementation of breed-health strategies, review aspects of extreme conformation and share useful information on behavior. The meeting also heralded the development of an online resource of relevant information describing quality measures for DNA testing. A demand for more and better data and evidence was a recurring message stressed across all themes. The meeting confirmed the benefits from inclusion of a diverse range of stakeholders who all play relevant and collaborative parts to improve future canine health. Firm actions were set for progress towards improving breed-related welfare. The next international workshop will be in the UK in 2019 and will be organized by the UK Kennel Club.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 31%
Student > Master 5 31%
Librarian 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 38%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,425,035
of 12,367,425 outputs
Outputs from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#50
of 63 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,024
of 351,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,425 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 63 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 54.1. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.