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The economic burden of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the US on payers and patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
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Title
The economic burden of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the US on payers and patients
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12913-014-0676-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mirko Sikirica, Serban R Iorga, Tim Bancroft, Jesse Potash

Abstract

BackgroundPulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare condition that can ultimately lead to right heart failure and death. In this study we estimated the health care costs and resource utilization associated with PAH in a large US managed care health plan.MethodsSubjects with claims-based evidence of PAH from 1/1/2004 to 6/30/2010 (identification period) were selected. To be included in the final PAH study sample, subjects were required to have ¿2 claims with a primary PH diagnosis; ¿2 claims with a PAH related-diagnosis (connective tissue diseases, congenital heart diseases, portal hypertension); and ¿1 claim with evidence of a PAH-indicated medication. The earliest date of a claim with evidence of PAH-indicated medication during the identification period was set as the index date. Health care costs and resource utilization were compared between an annualized baseline period and a 12 month follow-up period.Results504 PAH subjects were selected for the final study cohort. Estimated average total health care costs were approximately 16% lower in the follow-up period compared to the baseline period (follow-up costs¿=¿$98,243 [SD¿=¿110,615] vs. baseline costs¿=¿$116,681 [SD¿=¿368,094], p¿<¿0.001), but substantively high in each period relative to costs reported for other chronic diseases. Pharmacy costs were significantly higher in the follow-up period vs. the baseline period, ($38,514 [SD¿=¿34,817] vs. $6,440 [SD¿=¿12,186], p¿<¿0.001) but medical costs were significantly lower in the follow-up vs. baseline ($59,729 [SD¿=¿106,683] vs. $110,241 [SD¿=¿368,725], p¿<¿0.001). These costs were mirrored in health-care resource utilization estimates. The average counts of ambulatory visits and inpatient stays were lower in the follow-up vs. the baseline (both p¿<¿0.001). Results varied in exploratory analyses when less restrictive subject identification algorithms were used.ConclusionsSubjects with evidence of PAH had substantively high health care costs. Medical costs appeared to decrease following PAH medication use, but with a concomitant increase in pharmacy costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 54 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 24%
Student > Master 10 17%
Other 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 16 28%
Unknown 12 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,029,494
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#448
of 4,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,135
of 272,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#44
of 504 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,967 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 504 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.