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Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle

Overview of attention for article published in Nucleic Acids Research, December 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle
Published in
Nucleic Acids Research, December 2014
DOI 10.1093/nar/gku1349
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonio Jordán-Pla, Ishaan Gupta, Lola de Miguel-Jiménez, Lars M. Steinmetz, Sebastián Chávez, Vicent Pelechano, José E. Pérez-Ortín

Abstract

The particular behaviour of eukaryotic RNA polymerases along different gene regions and amongst distinct gene functional groups is not totally understood. To cast light onto the alternative active or backtracking states of RNA polymerase II, we have quantitatively mapped active RNA polymerases at a high resolution following a new biotin-based genomic run-on (BioGRO) technique. Compared with conventional profiling with chromatin immunoprecipitation, the analysis of the BioGRO profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that RNA polymerase II has unique activity profiles at both gene ends, which are highly dependent on positioned nucleosomes. This is the first demonstration of the in vivo influence of positioned nucleosomes on transcription elongation. The particular features at the 5' end and around the polyadenylation site indicate that this polymerase undergoes extensive specific-activity regulation in the initial and final transcription elongation phases. The genes encoding for ribosomal proteins show distinctive features at both ends. BioGRO also provides the first nascentome analysis for RNA polymerase III, which indicates that transcription of tRNA genes is poorly regulated at the individual copy level. The present study provides a novel perspective of the transcription cycle that incorporates inactivation/reactivation as an important aspect of RNA polymerase dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Bulgaria 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 64 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 35%
Researcher 19 28%
Student > Master 8 12%
Unspecified 4 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 65%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 25%
Unspecified 3 4%
Computer Science 1 1%
Physics and Astronomy 1 1%
Other 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,107,510
of 13,664,802 outputs
Outputs from Nucleic Acids Research
#8,481
of 21,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,700
of 295,579 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nucleic Acids Research
#165
of 357 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,664,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 21,430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,579 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 357 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.