↓ Skip to main content

Human presence diminishes the importance of climate in driving fire activity across the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
35 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
Human presence diminishes the importance of climate in driving fire activity across the United States
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1713885114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandra D. Syphard, Jon E. Keeley, Anne H. Pfaff, Ken Ferschweiler

Abstract

Growing human and ecological costs due to increasing wildfire are an urgent concern in policy and management, particularly given projections of worsening fire conditions under climate change. Thus, understanding the relationship between climatic variation and fire activity is a critically important scientific question. Different factors limit fire behavior in different places and times, but most fire-climate analyses are conducted across broad spatial extents that mask geographical variation. This could result in overly broad or inappropriate management and policy decisions that neglect to account for regionally specific or other important factors driving fire activity. We developed statistical models relating seasonal temperature and precipitation variables to historical annual fire activity for 37 different regions across the continental United States and asked whether and how fire-climate relationships vary geographically, and why climate is more important in some regions than in others. Climatic variation played a significant role in explaining annual fire activity in some regions, but the relative importance of seasonal temperature or precipitation, in addition to the overall importance of climate, varied substantially depending on geographical context. Human presence was the primary reason that climate explained less fire activity in some regions than in others. That is, where human presence was more prominent, climate was less important. This means that humans may not only influence fire regimes but their presence can actually override, or swamp out, the effect of climate. Thus, geographical context as well as human influence should be considered alongside climate in national wildfire policy and management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 87 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 17%
Student > Master 12 14%
Unspecified 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 16 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 32 37%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 20 23%
Unspecified 20 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 91. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2018.
All research outputs
#174,069
of 13,348,042 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4,025
of 79,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,984
of 386,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#145
of 935 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,348,042 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,970 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 386,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 935 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.