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Probiotic bacteria in fermented foods: product characteristics and starter organisms

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2001
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
265 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
383 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Probiotic bacteria in fermented foods: product characteristics and starter organisms
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2001
Pubmed ID
Authors

K J Heller, Heller, K J, Knut J Heller

Abstract

Probiotic bacteria are sold mainly in fermented foods, and dairy products play a predominant role as carriers of probiotics. These foods are well suited to promoting the positive health image of probiotics for several reasons: 1) fermented foods, and dairy products in particular, already have a positive health image; 2) consumers are familiar with the fact that fermented foods contain living microorganisms (bacteria); and 3) probiotics used as starter organisms combine the positive images of fermentation and probiotic cultures. When probiotics are added to fermented foods, several factors must be considered that may influence the ability of the probiotics to survive in the product and become active when entering the consumer's gastrointestinal tract. These factors include 1) the physiologic state of the probiotic organisms added (whether the cells are from the logarithmic or the stationary growth phase), 2) the physical conditions of product storage (eg, temperature), 3) the chemical composition of the product to which the probiotics are added (eg, acidity, available carbohydrate content, nitrogen sources, mineral content, water activity, and oxygen content), and 4) possible interactions of the probiotics with the starter cultures (eg, bacteriocin production, antagonism, and synergism). The interactions of probiotics with either the food matrix or the starter culture may be even more intensive when probiotics are used as a component of the starter culture. Some of these aspects are discussed in this article, with an emphasis on dairy products such as milk, yogurt, and cheese.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 383 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
Brazil 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
India 2 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Ukraine 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 363 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 104 27%
Student > Master 63 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 57 15%
Researcher 41 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 5%
Other 64 17%
Unknown 33 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 178 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 36 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 21 5%
Engineering 17 4%
Other 61 16%
Unknown 48 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2017.
All research outputs
#405,562
of 12,661,434 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#1,176
of 9,213 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,622
of 288,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#25
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,661,434 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,213 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,082 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.