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The Evolution and Functional Impact of Human Deletion Variants Shared with Archaic Hominin Genomes

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Biology and Evolution, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 3,376)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
43 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
The Evolution and Functional Impact of Human Deletion Variants Shared with Archaic Hominin Genomes
Published in
Molecular Biology and Evolution, January 2015
DOI 10.1093/molbev/msu405
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yen-Lung Lin, Pavlos Pavlidis, Emre Karakoc, Jerry Ajay, Omer Gokcumen

Abstract

Allele sharing between modern and archaic hominin genomes has been variously interpreted to have originated from ancestral genetic structure or through non-African introgression from archaic hominins. However, evolution of polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes has yet to be studied. We identified 427 polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, approximately 87% of which originated before the Human-Neandertal divergence (ancient) and only approximately 9% of which have been introgressed from Neandertals (introgressed). Recurrence, incomplete lineage sorting between human and chimp lineages, and hominid-specific insertions constitute the remaining approximately 4% of allele sharing between humans and archaic hominins. We observed that ancient deletions correspond to more than 13% of all common (>5% allele frequency) deletion variation among modern humans. Our analyses indicate that the genomic landscapes of both ancient and introgressed deletion variants were primarily shaped by purifying selection, eliminating large and exonic variants. We found 17 exonic deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, including those leading to three fusion transcripts. The affected genes are involved in metabolism of external and internal compounds, growth and sperm formation, as well as susceptibility to psoriasis and Crohn's disease. Our analyses suggest that these "exonic" deletion variants have evolved through different adaptive forces, including balancing and population-specific positive selection. Our findings reveal that genomic structural variants that are shared between humans and archaic hominin genomes are common among modern humans and can influence biomedically and evolutionarily important phenotypes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 6%
Italy 2 3%
France 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Ireland 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 67 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 27%
Student > Master 14 18%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 17 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 13%
Unspecified 6 8%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 8 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 122. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2015.
All research outputs
#105,084
of 12,356,629 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#36
of 3,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,642
of 267,976 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Biology and Evolution
#1
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,356,629 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,376 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,976 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.